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Drug and Alcohol Testing

drugs-and-alcohol testing

Driving or attempting to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a major cause of road injuries and death.

Apart from the potentially lethal consequences of drink and/or drug driving, you can lose your licence, be jailed and fined up to £5,000.

 

It's also an offence to drive, attempt to drive or be in charge of a motor vehicle on a road or other public place, after consuming so much alcohol that the proportion of it in your breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

The police may require a breath test:

  • If you have been driving or attempting to drive or have been in charge of a motor vehicle on a road or other public place and have committed a traffic offence while the vehicle was in motion
  • If you have been driving or attempting to drive or in charge of a motor vehicle on a road or other public place at the time of a road accident
  • If they have reasonable cause to suspect that you have been driving or attempting to
    drive or in charge of a motor vehicle on a road or other public place and have alcohol
    in your body

 

Arrest

It's an offence if you, without reasonable excuse, fail to provide a specimen of breath when required to do so. A police officer may arrest you without warrant if, as a result of a breath test, he has reasonable cause to suspect that the proportion of alcohol in your breath or blood exceeds the prescribed limit, or you have failed to provide a specimen of breath or the police officer has reasonable cause to suspect that you have alcohol in your body. The easiest way to avoid exceeding the prescribed limits is NEVER to drink and drive.

The police may also arrest you without warrant if there's reasonable cause to suspect that you are or have been driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle on a road or other public place while unfit to drive through drink or drugs. The police can test you at the roadside if you are suspected of being under the influence of drugs.

It is important to be aware that, even within prescribed limits, there is still an increased risk of being involved in a collision if you drink alcohol or take drugs before you drive.